JacHB, Henry Barton Jacobs Collection in the Alan Mason Chesney Medical Archives of the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions


Collection Overview

Call number:JacHB
Repository:Alan Mason Chesney Medical Archives of the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions
Title:Henry Barton Jacobs Collection
Date:1887-1939 - inclusive
Extent:13 linear feet
Creator:Jacobs, Henry Barton

Administrative/Biographical History:

Henry B. Jacobs

2 Jun 1858-18 Dec 1939

Henry Barton Jacobs was born in Hingham, Massachusetts. He received his A.B. in 1883 and his M.D. in 1887, both from Harvard University. Jacobs came to Baltimore to become the private physician for Robert Garrett, then president of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. After Garrett's death in 1896, he joined the faculty of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, retiring in 1905. He maintained an interest in tuberculosis and took an active role in the anti-tuberculosis campaign. In 1911, he was elected a trustee of the Johns Hopkins Hospital, a position he held until his death. Jacobs married Mary Frick Garrett, Robert Garrett's widow, in 1902. In the latter part of his career Jacobs cultivated interests in the fine arts and the history of medicine. In 1932, he donated his collection of medical books, medallions, and engravings, and a room to house the collection, to the Johns Hopkins University's Institute of the History of Medicine.

Chronology:
1897-1905 - Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
1911-1939 - Johns Hopkins Hospital

Scope and Content:
The Henry Barton Jacobs Collection spans his entire career. It consists of correspondence with individuals and organizations (1887-1939), scrapbooks (1893-1930s), papers regarding the Osler Anniversary Volume (1919-1921), and two boxes of "tuberculosis clippings" (1904-1916). Key correspondents include Harvey Cushing, William Halsted, and Thomas Futcher. Additional Jacobs' correspondence may be found in the personal paper collections of John Jacob Abel, Thomas B. Cullen, William S. Halsted, Adolf Meyer, William Osler, and William H. Welch.

Language: English